Old school hip hop songs

I love this quote from one of my favorite songwriters. Have you ever heard a song that captures exactly what you’re feeling? A song that makes you say, “YES! That’s exactly it, I just wasn’t able to express it myself!” Well, my friends, that’s one of the many joys of songwriting. So yes, you have a responsibility to help others with your words and melodies. Some days you might feel like you’re not helping anyone, but remember: The world needs the magic of music. And if musicians didn’t exist, we would never have that feeling of catharsis. And I don’t want to live in that world.

In an interview with The Hollywood Reporter, Ryan Tedder, a songwriter and the frontman of OneRepublic, once said: “With iPhones, nobody has an excuse for writer’s block. If you’re at Whole Foods getting your green tea extract and you have a melody, you just drop it into your voice memo and save it for later.” Going along with Ryan’s idea, if you have stockpiles of melodies and song snippets saved in your phone, go back to listen to them and you might find your “diamond in the rough” idea that will kickstart a new song for you.

Grants emerging artists

But “Blurred Lines” was hardly the first copyright case to rattle Lady Justice’s scale. Here are five important music copyright infringement cases that every songwriter should know about.

Make sure you at least understand and consider maintaining and registering publishing ownership when you let others use your beat. Otherwise, you run the risk of making the beat to a song but never getting properly paid for it. Consider further that it is very easy to distribute your music as a standalone product. People like instrumentals, too. Spotify recognizes when listeners like your music and will help you find your listener base, algorithmically if not personally.