So normally with this series we look at lectures and videos that focus on a single artist, but today we’re throwing both of those concepts out the window and zooming in on a recent panel held at the annual Ableton Loop Conference featuring educators, not artists, and not one, but three of them. The panelists: Ethan Hein, Doctoral Fellow in Music Education at NYU, adjunct professor of music technology at NYU and Montclair State University, and Soundfly instructor; Melissa Uye-Parker, British songwriter, performer, and educator based in London; and Jack Schaedler, software developer at Ableton who has worked on Ableton’s microsite for learning music fundamentals. And the panel was moderated by none other than Dennis DeSantis, composer, sound designer, percussionist, and author, who is also Head of Documentation for Ableton.

Let’s look at some examples and how to approach writing with both kinds of bass sounds. And if this article whets your appetite for hip-hop beat production tips, head over to our mentored online course The Art of Hip-Hop Production now and grab a free preview!

I’m not sure if it’s interesting or anti-interesting that our meter chart matches almost exactly with last year’s, at thirty-seven 4/4s, two 12/8s, and instead of the uncommon gatling gun 24/16, we found a somewhat-rare-in-its-own-right 2/4 meter.

Pabst blue ribbon review

Another extremely common and timeless technique to make your chorus shine is simply cutting the music out completely for half a measure or even an entire measure in some cases. Some of today’s electronic producers also prefer cutting out effects such as reverb and delay, to make that moment of silence even more dramatic, like you’re falling off a tiny cliff. This technique is especially fun to apply in situations where the chorus vocals start with pick-up notes from the previous measure.

We’ll keep it in the family again with the second release in Ashikawa’s “Wave Notation” series, his own album, Still Way. This record actually features Midori Takada on harp and vibraphone. Ashikawa only released three records in this series before he died; the third was a full LP of pensive Erik Satie pieces played on solo piano by Satsuki Shibano.

+ Learn a new musical skill in 10 minutes. Explore Soundfly’s wide array of free online courses and gain a musical edge during your lunch break. Or sign up for the Soundfly Weekly newsletter and learn something new every Tuesday!

To find out which note is in Fret 8 on the 3rd string, we need to route it back to the same note an octave below on the 5th string. In order to do so, we move two frets back and skip one string (follow the green arrow). The resulting note is in Fret 6 on the 5th string, so D#/E♭. 

When you’re a musician, it helps to have a job that you can take off every now and then when you go on tour or into the studio, here’s a few of our faves!

Pabst blue ribbon price

But here’s the good thing. Before you go spending $6,000 on a professional studio, you don’t need a pristinely recorded full-length album under your belt at all. Demos are fine, but try to get a decently home-recorded and mixed couple of tracks together whenever possible. If it doesn’t sound perfect, that’s fine, just don’t print and sell copies of those songs yet. Just don’t think about booking local shows until you’ve got music to share.

If you’re ready to get started, tell us about yourself. If you want to know more, just head over to the Headliners Club info page or feel free get in touch with us via email.

Jeremy is a Montreal-based musician, sound artist and improviser who loves giving advice to emerging artists on how to make their tours more effective. He writes, records and performs electroacoustic “concrète” music for tape, oscillators and amplified objects and surfaces, as well as solo guitar. He has performed and released material throughout Europe and the UK, Asia, the US and Canada, mostly with his trio Sontag Shogun.

This scene, where Marissa shoots Trey (I never watched The OC but I’m getting this all from the YouTube description), was where a lot of people were introduced to the artistry of Imogen Heap. Her song “Hide and Seek” stands alone for the British singer, and in this clip, where one character is killing another by choking him, the gunshot by Marissa is justified to the viewers by Heap’s line, “It’s all for the best.”

And lastly, there’s more than probably a bit of synchronicity in the fact that as Brown’s album starts with “I’ll Go Crazy,” Prince’s live show inspired soundtrack album Purple Rain starts with a raucous, no holds barred version of his “Let’s Go Crazy.”