When Houston’s song focuses on notes 1, 3, and 5, it’s focusing on the notes that rank highest in what music theorists call the “tonal hierarchy.” Hughes describes it as such: “The tonal hierarchy is this idea that certain notes are sort of more important than others.” In the major key, we generally talk about four levels of note importance.

By developing consistent workflows, streamlining one’s process (like for example using shortcut commands), setting limitations as well as reasonable yet strict deadlines, you will begin to see tasks getting completed faster and projects sounding better. In addition, focusing on optimizing your time management will naturally leave you with good habits and higher levels of confidence.

+ Learning to record and mix at home? Check out Soundfly’s newly launched Making Music in Logic Pro X mentored online course today! Or, share your musical goals with us, and we’ll find a course suited for you.

Music therapy research jobs

But while all that extra time and opportunity can certainly help musicians learn to home record, produce, and mix, it might set us off with some bad time management habits if we’re not careful. Sometimes having too much time, or too much choice in terms of what instruments or sounds to use can debilitate our focus and our sense of making the most out of our studio hours. There is such a thing as too much of a good thing.

I started doing these critiques to solve the practical problems of grading my classes in a meaningful way, and of keeping my early morning sections from staring silently at me with blank expressions. But I’ve noticed that the students take suggestions from the critiques seriously, in a way that they don’t always take the rest of the class. Some kids might blow off assignments and fail to retain technical information from one week to the next, but then they’ll reference a comment about how they should have longer sections in their tracks, months after hearing it.

In the diagram below, the left side demonstrates how two in-phase waves sum to an amplified resulting signal. The right side demonstrates two precisely out-of-phase waves are attenuated to silence.

This should come as no surprise, but if you’re trying to stay hydrated, you’ve got to lay off the booze. Excess alcohol consumption decreases the body’s anti-diuretic hormone production, which is what helps the body reabsorb water. In other words, it causes your body to lose more fluid than normal through increased urination.

His yodeling obsession was accompanied by a love of obscure stringed instruments like the zither and hammered dulcimer, both of which he taught himself as a child. In his teens, Ischi taught himself to yodel by listening to Franzl Lang records and imitating what he heard. In case you aren’t familiar, Lang is one of yodeling’s most revered figures and is widely known as the “Yodel King.”

Rappers with felonies

Key-wise, I feel like there’s almost too much tonal information for everyone to hear it the same. If it was just up to the melody, I’d say hands down G major because the melody starts and ends on G the majority of the time (where has that pun been all my life?). However, there’s a clear E in the bass under the G at certain cadence points, making for a v chord (Em11) leading us back to Am, which comes on the strong beat. These are two good reasons to hear it in A Dorian.

Admitting that no music is truly 100% original (even the great composers of classical music borrowed ideas from their predecessors and contemporaries), consider which artists you draw influence from and what elements of their music you find to be most similar, inspiring, and relatable to your vision.

When we say that a piece of music is in a particular key, it means that it’s leaving out some of the notes. Bach’s chaconne is in D minor, so it only uses the notes D, E, F, G, A, B♭, and C. (And sometimes C# to add some drama to the chords.) That’s a more manageable number of notes to keep track of in your head. Also, they’re all related in a variety of nifty, simple mathematical ways. In D minor, you usually avoid using the notes E♭, G♭, A♭, and B. Those notes sound “wrong,” or in music theory terms, dissonant.

Even though Zen is filled with useful technical tips, all that information is grounded within its proper context: great music and the emotions which fuel it. Based on the success of this volume, Mixerman went on to pen two more Zen volumes covering audio production, so don’t sleep on checking out the full set.

Student-Artist: Emily McCullough