He goes on: “And the next two notes on the hierarchy are E and G.” Those are the third and fifth notes of the C major scale, they make up the basis for the C major chord, and so they are of secondary importance.

Alisu is an IDM and dub producer who has been a major proponent of Chile’s underground music scene in the last few years. She uses both analog and digital synths so expect to hear everything from fat Moog thumps to wild FM synthesis sounds. What sets her apart is her creative and mesmerizing use of field recordings. There seems to be an underlying sense of nature interwoven into the very essence of her music. It’s almost impossible to describe but it’s as if she’s trying to pull us into an unknown tropical paradise.

Without the internet around to provide an unbroken timeline of artistic events to a potentially endless landscape of wandering eyes, records that couldn’t achieve access to a viable fanbase in the 1980s have mostly, inevitably found themselves buried in the sands of time forever. Many creative masterworks, no matter how well-appreciated at the time of their initial pressing — if mismanaged by independent, boutique labels that couldn’t stay afloat financially — have either approached or gone completely off the cliff edge of existence. But thanks to the interplay between user-submitted content on the web and the way platforms help listeners discover it, some records do actually manage to climb back out of the sand.

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“THERE IS A PHRASE about two minutes from the end of J. S. Bach’s famous Chaconne for solo violin that, if you are in the right mood or are hearing the right performer, can suddenly sound like a shriek or a growl or a moan…. What it really is, in official violinist’s terms, is bariolage: the rapid repetition of one note against which another line rises or falls. In this case the violinist obsessively saws on one pitch while the main melody strains to climb beyond it, bulging and sinking and then repeating the effort.”

The queen of jazz has a beautiful point here and it’s such a great reminder that “love is the thing.” Isn’t that why we play music? We freakin’ love it and it makes us feel alive. We play to empty clubs, bare our souls, and write about our broken hearts for the love of it. And isn’t it amazing that you’ve found something you love? There are a lot of people out there who have no idea what their passion is — who may work dead-end jobs or feel lost. I used to be one. But when I found music, it was like finding God. I’m not religious, but I can see how people get into it. It feels amazing to have something you love, something nobody can take away from you. And to me, that’s the key to a happy and successful life.

Have you had experience playing house concerts often? Share your stories with us below, or help educate the rest of the DIY touring community by joining and posting in our free online course, Touring on a Shoestring.

When pitching to venues, being completely honest about what you can deliver is essential for building trust and solid relationships for years to come. A promoter might ask: “What’s your draw for Kansas City?” If it’s 25, say 25, even if that means you won’t get booked. If it’s zero, say zero, but say you’re willing to boost Facebook ads in the area and send a bunch of press releases out.

These questions are important. Hopefully this quick guide can help you pick out the right amp for your needs. And since you probably don’t live in an area with unlimited choice, we know it can sometimes be hard to find niche, small production amps and it’s usually quite expensive to buy vintage pieces. So we wanted to focus on amps that are largely available in music stores anywhere. This list features common guitar amplifiers and their “types,” if you find similar amps, replicas, or alternate versions or editions, those would all work great!

Exhibition grants

There are plenty of ways to have more fun on tour, but these were the first 10 I could think of that don’t cost a ton. Money does not buy fun, but it sure can help — so I tried to list the cheapest tactics. Thanks for reading!

I do give students my opinions on their music, during our in-class, art-school-style critique sessions (and sometimes also as timed SoundCloud comments.) I consider this subjective group critique to be the actually valuable form of feedback. As a group, we listen to each person’s assignment and then talk about it. We try to figure out:

This would also be a good place to bring up that some music theory people don’t consider two-note intervals “chords.” But my take on that whole controversy is that, when naming things, it should be taken into account how our brains ascertain tonal information based on everything we’ve heard before, in all of music. It’s just something our brains do, so why deny it because we selfishly want a more tidy nomenclature?

Learn more on Soundfly: Check out Soundfly’s free online course, Touring on a Shoestring, and get better at booking, managing, and promoting your DIY tours in a matter of hours! Here’s a video from the course!

The main takeaway here is that you don’t have to follow a typical form if you don’t want to! There’s so much great through-composed music, and sometimes, it can be really freeing to embrace this kind of writing.